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Veritas
This is a compilation of the blog posts that Turnus posts to his blog, Veritas.

Author's Note: The "Read Mores" at the end of each blogpost are underlined. They are not actually links, and won't go anywhere.

An Introduction

A bit of background before I start this blog: my name is Turnus Wyllt, and I’m currently a second-year student at Ever After High. I didn’t sign the Storybook of Legends but I do know my destiny, I’m meant to be the next King Merlin’s son in the Princess Mayblossom.

I think the fairytale world is seriously kind of messed up, and I also think I’ve recently experienced a discrepancy in the fairytale world that is probably due to it being messed up. Someone who I thought was in the story I was assigned to as been switched out with another person… and people are definitely covering up the existence of the original person.

If people are able to completely remove the existence of one person – a legacy, essentially a celebrity –, and have no one question it, what else can they do?

Well, it seems, a lot.

Veritas Part I

This is a compilation of some blog posts published in the first part of Veritas Virumque.

Monday:

Magical artefacts: definitely a money laundering scheme.
Some magical artefacts serve as a laundering service. They will wash your clothes and shine your shoes. How do they do this? Simple, you use magical artefacts to launder money, and then you can use your laundered money to hire people to wash your clothes and shine your shoes for you!

Two months ago, several artefacts were recently retrieved from an underwater cave. Known as “von Schonwerth’s treasures”, these were soon put up on auction for prestigious research institutions around the world of Ever After to study. Some of these were bought by a group of wizards with a very fascinating work and employment history.

Read more…


Tuesday:

On Author “legacies”. Who are they for?

To all the reactionaries who are going to be reading this, I just want you to know that Storybook Romance Island is coming soon to Ever After, so you should go binge that before coming back to this blog.

Read more…


Wednesday:

An investigation into mental health services for villain students, and the effects of intergenerational trauma.

Hello all! I see that reader is really growing. I don’t know how or why this small blog is becoming popular, but I have another installment for you today.

The reputation of villainous students at Ever After High has changed a lot in recent months. I remember seeing non-villains (for lack of a better word) literally running away in fear from Raven Queen, and I would see genuine offers of help and compassion offered by villains turned down in fear of ulterior motives. Some more minor observations anyone would see around the school was how villains, during mixed villains and non-villain classes, would often have their ideas dismissed or shot down more than other students. I could go on.

But Turnus, you say, these are merely anecdotes! Sure, fine, whatever, but these are also anecdotes that are BACKED UP by SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES. Here are three [1][2][3], which talk about biases against people who are “villain-coded” (ugh, I don’t like these terms), and how they change depending on populations (the youth are the least biased, so we can proudly say that The Kids Are Alright). In the footnotes I’m going to link a Woogle Drive folder[4] of a bunch of PDFs I’ve saved of MORE SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES. Did you know that having an Ever After High email (whether you’re a student or a staff) means that you can access any academic paper from all major publications? Elsevierafter’s paywall, eat my ***.

Point is, we’ve seen a large change in this school! I don’t care much for popularity, but the data doesn’t lie: Raven Queen has by far become the most popular student in the halls of Ever After High. So definitely, our perception of villains is changing.

How are our resources for villains, however?

Read more…


Friday:

Part II of An investigation into mental health services for villain students, and the effects of intergenerational trauma.

I received a lot of complaints from the last blog post that I was blinding everyone with science. Firstly, I do not do anything remotely blinding, the purpose of this blog is to help you all see the truth. Secondly, I back myself up with statistics and officially published reports. These have been objectively investigated.

Thirdly -- because hey, we are fairytales and there’s the Rule of Three --, I guess the readers just want the human perspective. That’s fine. I guess I’m only human as well.

So, today I have found two villains who are willing to share their experiences. Ablative Charming and Raider Espouse are here to talk about how the school accommodates and supports their villainous students.

Ablative: I like to call myself a triple threat—I’m a princess, a prince and a villain. I’m also a double threat, because I have a sharp mind and a sharp sword.

Turnus: Please put down the sword, this is a written interview.

Raider: I also exist!

Turnus: Hello to you too, Raider.

Ablative: Right, so my point is, other than the point on a sword, is that without villains, stories wouldn’t exist. Without conflict, what is there that is worthwhile to listen to? Fundamentally, villains are what drive fairytales. Without us, you’d all be null.

Raider: I don’t really like being a villain. I’m starting to like it a lot less now with that perspective… that’s a lot of pressure...

Ablative: I, for one, used to be a prince. I used to take all the princely classes, before I found out my destiny. Therefore, out of all the people here, I think I am the most equipped to talk about the vast differences between how the two are treated at Ever After High.

Read more…


Sunday:

Ever After High and its monopolisation of fairytale education.

Apparently, what I’ve been posting about on a) mental health services for villainous students and b) the intergenerational trauma that comes with being a villain, is actually a hot topic in the circles of psychology and sociology! People are writing their PhD theses, or doing post-doctorate research...

I emailed some of the doctors (in psychology and sociology) working on this sort of stuff. The response I got back was near-instantaneous (like, two hours?) and well-thought out.

An interesting point of fact. If you send emails via your student email, people will tend to respond to you quickly. By quickly, I mean quickly, you get prioritised over people from other academic institutions, even if they were Ox-trollbridge.

That “@everafterhigh.edu”? Cherish it well, future academics.

Ever After High is not the only school for future fairytales. Take any generic destiny - an Arthurian knight, for instance, and there’s a specialised school somewhere for them.

Take a close, close look at the Board of Trustees for any of these schools, and things start to look a little funny. Draw up their family trees, see who’s married to whom, and who’s inheriting what, you’ll see what I mean.

Read more…


Monday:

No ethical consumption in the fairytale world.

Do you know how many dwarf mines the Snow White corporation owns? Faerbes named her businessperson of the year several times already for a reason.

Read more…


Wednesday:

Guest Blog: Eleanor Shalott on “wonder” depletion.

I’m getting a little sick of my own typing voice. Do you know what exists other than my own typing voice? Other people’s typing voices. I didn’t think I would ever get around to doing “guest blogs” -- I didn’t think I’d be cool enough to do guest blogs in the first place.

I'll let Eleanor Shalott introduce herself.

~*~

Hey, cheers Turnus. So many people are out there, realising the devastating effects of climate change, and are only thinking about people. You people suck. You know what you should be thinking about instead?

The inevitable cold death of the universe.

Read more…


Veritas Part II

These are blog posts published during the second part of Veritas Virumque.

Veritas Part III

These are blog posts published during the third part of Veritas Virumque.

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